La Caja de Teatro de Travis Addams

The Answer Will Always Be No If You Never Ask.
recursivechic:

…No party like a Poiret Party cause a Poiret party was FABulous!

recursivechic:

…No party like a Poiret Party cause a Poiret party was FABulous!

dressatdownton:

While Poiret was definitely a stand-out, it’s important to put his work in context with other couturiers.  These Paquin coats are very similar to his - not because (as he put it) Paul Poiret led everyone else by the hand, but because the 1910s were all about moving away from the past.  Architecture, fashion design, art were all moving towards modernism, and the designers who tapped into this were the ones that succeeded.  Orientalism had been a key design element for decades, but before the 20th century its influence in fashion was mainly felt in trims and fabric - the progression to an influence in cut was almost inevitable.

But - Paquin.  My point was that she was making exquisite, modern pieces like these as early as Poiret, and that the female couturiers who dominated this decade tend to get sidelined in favor of male ones.  It doesn’t help that Poiret wrote a very self-aggrandizing autobiography in which he claimed to have come up with every fashion innovation of the decade.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

recursivechic:

Lepape’s illustration ‘La fete Persane’, most likely Paul and Denise Poiret’s “The Thousand and Second Night” party, 1912

recursivechic:

Lepape’s illustration ‘La fete Persane’, most likely Paul and Denise Poiret’s “The Thousand and Second Night” party, 1912

sydneyflapper:

The Delineator for October 1923 illustrates Parisian fashions, some of them showing the Russian influence prevalent at the time.
Leigh Gillard collection

sydneyflapper:

The Delineator for October 1923 illustrates Parisian fashions, some of them showing the Russian influence prevalent at the time.

Leigh Gillard collection

transtemporalregina:

An early toaster from the 1920s. Doesn’t it look like a delightful contraption?

transtemporalregina:

An early toaster from the 1920s. Doesn’t it look like a delightful contraption?